Man vs Bookshelf: I Am Legend

This entry is part 11 of 12 in the series Man vs Bookshelf

Important milestone here.

I Am Legend was book number 10 in my quest for domination over my bookshelf.

That’s ten down, 200 to go.

Pretty neat, huh?

I’ve been enjoying myself so far.

It’s been tough, at times. When I don’t feel like reading or when I don’t have the time or when I’m knackered and just want to go to sleep.

But it’s great, persevering. It’s forced me to read books I would never have read otherwise.

Books that would have sat on my shelf unloved and uncared for until the end of days.

Like Wheezy in Toy Story… uh, 2? 3? In one of the Toy Story’s, anyway.

This challenge is equal opportunity. Everyone gets love.

Like a Disney film.

So this week’s princess and prince coupling are…

Richard Matherson and Me

I’ve little experience with Richard Matherson.

For example, no idea if he would like me referring to him as a princess.

Let’s assume yes.

I’d never read anything by him before I Am Legend.

I’m not even sure I’d heard of him until the 2007 Will Smith starring film adaptation of I Am Legend landed.

I enjoyed the film, and it was because of it I bought the book from HMV (Future readers might want to Wikipedia that one).

But (recurring theme) I never actually read it.

Until now.

I Am Legend

Read from: 20/11/2017 to: 21/11/2017

I’m fascinated with the origins of stories. Always have been. From conception to development to writing.

Anything that happens before it hits screens/ bookshops.

Whenever I enjoy a book or a film I seek out such information. Hoping to learn from the creative process, or to at least see some interesting facts.

It’s one of the reasons I love Darren Shan. His author notes are so detailed and offer real insight into his creative process.

Upon seeing I Am Legend, I was keen to find out about the book it was based on.

I could have read it, but it was easier (and more interesting) looking online.

So, I knew the film didn’t match the book in many ways, and that lots of what made the book so great was missing.

I also discovered the book had influenced such greats as Stephen King and Night of the Living Dead. Which meant it had indirectly influenced Night of the Living Dummy.

That was pretty exciting to find out.

Going into this book, then, I had preconceptions, without having any idea if I was going to like it or not.

But what is it about? What did I think of it? And why has it taken me so long to get to the meat of the review?

The Plot

I Am Legend is the story of a man alone in the world. Alone, that is, if you don’t count the vampire-like creatures that now cover the globe.

By day he goes on supply runs, builds up his fortress-like home, and slays sleeping vampires.

By night he hides in his home as the vampires – led by his old neighbour Ben – surround his home, screaming for him to come out. Unable to enter themselves because of his fortifications, which include cloves of garlic. For real.

Over time, our hero becomes dissatisfied with his life, which is understandable. He begins teaching himself ‘science’, trying to learn what happened to humanity. Doing this helps him become a more effective killer of the undead and the not quite dead.

Troubled by loneliness, alcoholism, and depression, our hero (Robert) spends as much time living in the past as the present. Until, finally, he meets another human.

Only even this is not the good news it could be, and this unexpected meeting leads towards the climax of the book.

A final confrontation with the creatures of the night.

General Thoughts

I Am Legend was a good book.

I’m not usually a fan of books written a long time ago, but this was good enough.

Fast paced, easy read, not a lot going on that’s offensive.

I suppose that’s the main thing to note. The best way to describe this book is in ways it wasn’t bad, rather than ways it was good.

In the end, I’d describe it as middle of the road, and so gave it a three out of five on Goodreads.

Did it deserve its legendary status? Eh, probably not but then I’ve never been too fussed about unicorns either so what do I know?

Depth

This book is a snip at 161 pages which was good for this challenge, and bad for the story.

Not a lot happens, and Robert is pretty plain.

He spends most his time killing sleeping vampires, moaning, or getting drunk.

And yes, two of those are my favourite things to do, too, but I’m not the protagonist of a book. That I know of.

The plot is light. The only exciting sequence pre-climax is one where he leaves his garage door open and gets home late.

This bit is enjoyable, but it also feels silly.

Robert is a man who has survived alone for months and months. This doesn’t happen by accident. Yet, one day he gets up, goes out, leaves his garage door open, and then falls asleep outside.

When he wakes, rather than going home, he does more vampire hunting.

It turns out his watch has broken but still, it’s crazy reckless and doesn’t speak of someone who would have survived so long.

For the rest of the novel he is sensible, and maybe that’s why it’s a bit dull. He does exactly what a survivor would do in an apocalypse situation, and where’s the fun in that?

His only other lapse in rational thought also prompts the climax of the book which goes to show. No one wants a protagonist who knows what he is doing.

Different types of Vampires

Ugh, this was confusing.

In I Am Legend, Vampirism is brought about by a bacterial virus (more on that later).

This is fine, in itself, but it does cause confusion when there are two types of vampires. Vampires that have died and risen again (proper vampires) and vampires that are the alive.

That’s right; they’re just infected, or something. Cheat vampires, you might call them.

Maybe I missed something, but there doesn’t seem to be a distinction between them. At least not until the very end.

Certainly, they are both hurt by the same things and seem to have the same abilities. For a long time, they even seem to chum along together pretty well. Again, until the very end.

Given the virus that turns people into vampires tends to kill, I’m not sure why living vampires ever happen.

I’m confused. Someone, please explain.

The Explain

Speaking of explaining…

A lot of tales get in trouble for trying to explain away fantasy with science.

Here’s the problem. Fantasy doesn’t exist. We don’t have zombies or vampires in real life because they can’t happen because science says so. (so there)

So, when stories take a monster and try and make it seem plausible with science, it often falls flat.

Worse, the explanation takes away from the strength of the story and weakens the effect of the plot.

Recent example: an episode of the latest series of Doctor Who. A house is eating people, and a girl is made of word. It’s proper weird and quite creepy.

Finally, the Doctor gets to meet the wooden girl and the creepy landlord and…

They sit down to talk about what has happened.

I get that this is what Doctor Who is about in many ways, but the explanation took from the plot, rather than adding.

All we wanted was for Doctor Who to get an axe, chop up the girl, set her on fire, then explode the house.

But I digress.

Reading other reviews of I Am Legend I know this problem annoyed a lot of people.

Robert spends a lot of the novel experimenting on the vampires. Finding out where the virus came from, then explaining it to us via internal monologue or his girl mate.

In the interest of fairness, I actually thought the explanation worked well. Or as well as any explanation could in such instances.

But in a book so short already, I felt Matherson could have devoted these pages to more interesting plot. More movement.

Most of it made sense, at least, but not all.

The only explain away that fell flat for me was the story of why Robert thought he was immune. Spoiler alert: it involves a vampire bat.

This was silly and unnecessary. It’s a virus. As readers, we accept there will be some immune people. That’s how it works.

We didn’t need some half-baked explanation to try and handle it.

That, unfortunately, was a detraction from the story as a whole.

Sum up

I’ll sum up now because otherwise, people will complain the sub-heading is misleading.

I Am Legend is legendary because of what it gave the horror genre. An interesting take on vampires. One of the first man living in a post-apocalyptic monster-filled world stories. An early blend of sci-fi, fantasy and horror.

The influence of the novel is unquestionable, that’s what makes it one of the most important books. Definitely in 1954, if not the last 100 years.

However, reviewing it in 2017 the story feels light, and a little underdeveloped. Where it has been developed is in sciency explanations that only half work and not in characterisations or story progression.

Although Robert does meet a dog at one point, the real story does not start motoring until the last fifteen percent.

So it’s good, and it was an enjoyable read, but a 3/5 is as good as I could have ranked it.

Some might say that is even too generous.

Next Time

From vampires to a group many think of as real monsters…

I’m delving into Non-fiction story Confessions of A Sociopath next.

Look out for that.

Man vs Bookshelf: The Escape

This entry is part 10 of 12 in the series Man vs Bookshelf

Another day, another review.

As I mentioned in my last review (whenever that came out. I’m about to move it at the time of writing to make room for something else) I’m dealing with quite a backlog of books.

I started ‘The Cuckoo’s Calling’ review having already finished The Escape, and started I Am Legend.

By the time I finished, I had read I Am Legend and began Confessions of a Sociopath. Something I didn’t mention in the final Cuckoo post because it ruined one of the jokes.

Going into this review, I have the same problem, with two other books contending for space in my head. The only good news is Sociopath has been quite slow going. If I’d started another book the confusion would become so bad my head would explode. In a bad way.

Confusion aside, there is another problem with these reviews. That being the disconnect between finishing a book and posting a review.

My worry is, should I ever get any readers who don’t live with me, people will notice that ‘Week 8’ is in ‘Week 10’ and such.

For example, I finished ‘The Escape’ on 19th November (that’s 2017, for future readers) but I’m typing this on the 26th.

That’s already almost a week out, and it only gets worse.

As I said above, I’ve had to move Cuckoo because I’ve finished my book for National Novel Writing Month. This now won’t come out until the 28th, and I’ve got another blog on the 1st Dec so Escape won’t be out until at least the 3rd.

You see my problem. The review is out almost two weeks after I finished reading it, and when people notice…

Cue mass hysteria.

So, to combat this farce, I’ll be writing the reading dates of each book at the beginning of the review.

See, it’s quite a simple solution.

Now, with that explanation out of the way, we’re almost ready to get on with this week’s review.

But first…

Robert Muchamore and Me

Having read 11 Cherub books, you might have thought I would look at The Escape and say ‘I can’t take Muchamore of this’.

No, you wouldn’t.

I just wanted to get that joke in.

Now we can move on.

When I was growing up Darren Shan was, for a long time, my favourite author.

My friend, Mohsin, introduced me to the Saga of Darren Shan (Cirque Du Freak for my American readers) at school.

From the first book, I loved the series, and I loved Darren Shan.

Fast paced. Action packed. Gory. They were great for kids, young adults, and, I assume, for getting boys into reading.

Sometime later, I discovered the CHERUB series by Robert Muchamore. And, sorry Shan, there was a new favourite writer in town.

I don’t know when I first picked up CHERUB book, The Recruit, but I knew I’d love the series from the get go.

It was a pull no punches series. It was more grown up. There was swearing and talk of tits and sex and all that stuff teenagers actually talk about. I loved it.

Given this, and the fact I waited with baited breath for each new Muchamore book to land, you’d have thought I’d have pounced on The Escape.

But I never read it.

I’ve been thinking about why this is, and I guess it’s to do with the time in which it is set, and the characters.

I did a History Degree at uni (college to my American readers) so I can’t stand anything set in the past. Duh. So, that put me off, but it wasn’t the main reason.

One of the big draws of the CHERUB series was its cast of characters. James Adams and co. were all so brilliant and, over 11 books, I became fully invested in them.

So invested that I couldn’t stomach the thought of reading about different characters.

So I didn’t read it. The book remained on my shelf while I read those other CHERUB books on repeat.

Until now.

The Escape

Read from: 19/11/2017 to: 19/11/2017

This is a short(ish) book, and it could be a short(ish) review.

The Escape is set early in World War II. The Nazis are in France, advancing across the country with their famed Blitzkrieg tactic. The Government abandon Paris upon realising they don’t want to be blown up. The whole country is in panic.

Within this historical setting, Robert introduces us to three children. Each struggling along in wartime France.

First, there’s Marc, a French boy (hey come on, give him a chance). Marc has grown up in an orphanage where he is frequently abused by The Director.

When the Germans arrive in town, Marc uses the commotion to escape. He steals a bike, food and money from the Director and flees south to Paris. Here he sets up camp in a house that turns out to belong to British Agent, Charles Henderson.

After Marc overhears valuable Gestapo information, Charles takes him on a mission. Together they seek to stop the Germans getting hold of vital plans that could shift the way in their favour.

These plans just so happen to be in the hands of Paul and Rosie. Two kids fleeing south from Paris, hoping to get a boat to England from Bordeaux to get the plans to safety.

The narrative beautifully bounces between these two stories until the climax, when they are finally brought together as a German spy attempts to get to the plans before Marc and Henderson.

The book is a speed read. We follow both Marc and Paul and Rosie as they run from the German’s, get into scrapes, and help with the war effort.

All my fears about not liking this because it was set in the past and didn’t feature a CHERUB cast were unwarranted.

This book brings in a new and exciting cast. The kids are smart, different, and worth investing in. Charles Henderson is not some boring parental figure. He’s shocking and violent and puts getting the job done above all else.

If and when I have children, this is the book I will give them when they start to hit their teenage years. There is no better series for getting kids into reading, I wouldn’t have thought.

I gave The Escape a four out of five on Goodreads, and well earned it was.

Later in this challenge, I will read the remaining CHERUB books, and I can’t wait. But I’m going to hold off for now.

I want something to look forward to, after all.

Next Time

This has been a shorter review (with no subtitles!) but hey, that means you get to go back to whatever interesting stuff you were supposed to do this afternoon sooner, right?

But, while you’re doing that, you can be thinking about the next review, coming soon.

It’s I Am Legend, hero of the Horror genre and inspiration to writers such as Stephen King and films such as Dawn of the Living Dead.

See you then.